Durham Fashion Show

The first annual Durham Fashion Show is happening this Thursday evening at MotorCo. In true Durham style, it is a collaborative effort, organized by Durham’s dtownMARKET founder, Kala Wolfe. Thursday’s fashion show, dubbed, “reFashioned,” features six local clothing designers, four local graphic clothing lines, along with local hairstylists, photographers, and DJ’s, including the evening’s MC the Real Laww, and to top it all off, forty-two, local models. It promises to be a spectacular showcase.1

There is not only a Fashion show at MotorCo Thursday evening, but after the show ends, attendees will be able to purchase clothing and accesories from all of the participating designers and clothing lines in MotorCo’s Garage.

At the same time, the main hall morphs into a dance party when the fashion show ends featuring DJ Queen Plz and DJ Birdgherl. And you know it wouldn’t be Durham, if there weren’t a few food trucks.

The Clarion Content had an opportunity to catch up with Kala Wolfe, the organizer and head of the Durham Fashion Show, “reFashioned,” for a few questions about how this all came together.

When did you think of the idea of a Durham fashion show?

Oh, wow, I think first thought of a smaller version of what we are doing with the Durham Fashion Show, “reFashioned” way back in November.

How did it come about initially?

It came about mostly because of the art and design I was seeing come through at the art market that I organize, dtownMARKET. A large percentage of the pieces that local artists bring to the market are made from discarded, found, or repurposed materials. Basically most of the art is made of “refashioned” materials; some of which is purely visually beautiful, and some of which is practical and functional.

I was seeing amazing talent, fantastic output, in so many forms. I was seeing really interesting fashion and design pieces coming through as well. This appealed to me because:

I believe that the art and design that you surround yourself with, including your personal style, say a lot about you.

It gives you confidence, and fosters a sense of self. However, I also have strong feelings about the environmental impacts of consumerism, and so fashion and design pieces that are made from discarded or second-hand items or from carefully sourced materials are a fantastic alternative to mainstream/industrial fashion.

It’s a sort of slow-fashion concept that mirrors the slow-food movement, and I think it can thrive in this area with the right attention brought to our local designers.

How did you decide to do the dtownMarket initially?

Initially I organized the first dtownMARKET because I wanted to have a very relaxed and fun environment where I could sell my vintage clothing collection. So I put the word out to local artist and creative types, surrounded myself with really amazingly gifted people, and held the first dtownMARKET in Duhram last May.

How has that gone?

Well it’s been over a year now and we are still holding dtown twice a month, on 1st and 3rd Sundays, at MotorCo Music Hall. Recently we added a third event at Moshi Moshi Salon in Durham during Third Friday Art Walk, which has been great. I accept new vendors all of the time, and we have a great rotating roster of fun and artistic, creative folks.

How has it been working with so many Durham collaborators?

This is absolutely the best part about organizing these events! I get to meet, and get to know so many artists in Durham and all over the Triangle. Everyone here loves being a part of creative projects and if they don’t know how to get something done, they know someone who does. I have so many wonderful people working extremely hard behind the scenes to make reFASHIONED happen, and I can’t wait to show them all off on the 19th!

Notes
1Full disclosure, the Clarion Content is one of the co-sponsors of the event, along with a host of other Durham luminaries from The Scrap Exchange to Cocoa Cinnamon, Net Friends and more.

We are delighted to have provided any and all the networking and support we could. The event is going to be great.

It would be unjust if we did not note, that is due in no small part to the efforts of the redoubtable Cady Childs, who not only has a line of clothing in the event, but has ably served to help the event’s founder Kala Wolfe coordinate this multifaceted evening.

Aaron Mandel

Aaron Mandel is a writer and an accomplished public speaker. He is the publisher of the Clarion Content. For more than a decade, the Clarion Content has covered Durham’s arts, politics, music, and cultural milieu. From breaking news stories to the hottest local acts, the Clarion Content is on the scene. The Clarion Content published more than twenty distinguished guest columnists and garnered nearly a million views. Mandel is a volunteer for the Durham Mighty Pen Literacy Project and serves as the President of the Board of Sustain-A-Bull Durham, a local small business collective with more than 200 members. He writes regularly on the Clarion Content and has been quietly writing fiction since the 4th grade. Mandel has been published in the Raleigh News and Observer. He has also produced numerous art shows, including, “Durham under Development”. He was a featured speaker at “The State of Publishing” conference. He has presented to Durham Chamber of Commerce, “Chamber U” on the “New Media”. He has also served as the play-by-play announcer for the D.B.L., a Durham youth basketball league. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in History and Religious Studies from Indiana University in Bloomington. An avid policy debater at Indiana and a Nation Debate Tournament qualifier, Mandel was also a member of the New Jersey State Champion two-person Policy Debate Team. He has lived in North Carolina, New Jersey, California, Texas, Illinois, Colorado, Indiana, and Baja California, Mexico.

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